Sunday, February 26, 2012

Newborn-Small Fitted Diaper Sewn-Up

I pulled out my sewing machine and set up at my daughter's toddler desk to try and sew up a sample of the revised NB-S fitted pattern. However, I was having problems with my bobbin tension. So, the stitching is very ugly. However... at least it is easier to SEE this way. ;)

Below are the diaper cuts arranged by top and bottom pieces with snaps applied through te top 3 layers. I used 4 layers of a T-shirt-like jersey fabric and one layer of upcycled cotton print from a pair of pajamas.

Here is the top view of the top section.

Everything pinned together faces toward eachother ready for sewing.

Sewn around with a fairly wide stitch in the seam allowance.
** A walking foot is your friend, when sewing with jersey.

Turned right-side-out through the open front.

Elastic casings sewn and soaker snap added.

Elastics sewn in.

Inside view.

Ready to close up that opening in the front.

Front closed up close to the edge (or many people like to serge here).

Top-stitching finished and the remaining snaps applied.

Small setting row.

Newborn setting row with umbilical snap-down.

Optional 3.5" wide snap-in long-fold soaker.

Soaker snapped into the diaper.


8 comments:

  1. hi again, sorry to keep asking so many questions i was just wondering what fabrics and how many layers you used for the soaker in this diaper, also what would be a good length for this type of soaker. thank you,

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    Replies
    1. I do it differently every time really. My favorite combo is inner heavy bamboo fleece, then a layer of regular bamboo fleece or cotton fleece and the outer cotton interlock or knit print. My favorite NB snap-in soaker is a shorter contour soaker that is about 10 inches long, 5 inches at the widest, and 3 inches at the narrowest. :)

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    2. Oh yeah, and my favorite soaker is 3 layers of baby bamboo terry or 3 layers of cotton fleece with a cotton or bamboo velour top. Serged.

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  2. Replies
    1. Using a safety pin or a bodkin, you insert it through the turning hole into and through the casing. Sew down the far end, remove the pin or bodkin, stretch to the desired stretchiness/tension, pin in place, and then sew down the other side. Then cut your elastic about .25-.5" after where you stitched it down. Then do the next... When done adding the elastics, close up your turning hole with your front top-stitching. I have a few tutorials that show those steps, but it gets tedious to include it every time. Especially when many people like to do their elastics differently.

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  3. i adore all your patterns they have helped out so much :)
    found out were expecting baby#4 so this little squish will have a momma made stash!!! thank you

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  4. I would love this pattern please.... attempting making cloth for my sister's first
    Yoshilove2527@gmail.com

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    Replies
    1. All the pattern templates are online for free download (linked from the downloads page in the right-side navigation).

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